Poems About Poetry for National Poetry Month

Have you ever read a poem ABOUT poetry?

Have you ever written one?

 

All it takes is a metaphor (comparison) and your imagination!

 

Here are some poems with metaphors

that compare poems to lots of different things.

 

 

What’s a Poem?

 

A whisper,

A shout,

Thoughts turned

Inside out.

 

A laugh,

A sigh,

An echo

Passing by.

 

A rhythm,

A rhyme,

A moment

Caught in time.

 

A moon,

A star,

A glimpse

Of who you are.

 

 

A Poem is a Spider Web

 

A poem is a spider web

Spun with words of wonder,

Woven lace held in place

By whispers made of thunder.

 

 

A Poem is a Firefly

 

A poem is a firefly

Upon the summer wind.

Instead of shining where she goes,

She lights up where she’s been!

 

 

A Poem is a Rosebud

 

A poem is a morning rose,

A promise just begun,

A blossom new with fragrant dew

Unfurling in the sun.

 

 

A Poem is a Mirror

 

A poem is a mirror

Sitting on a shelf

Inviting you to come and view

Reflections of yourself.

 

 

A Poem is a Painting

 

A poem is a painting,

A masterpiece divine,

Hanging on display inside

The gallery of your mind.

 

 

A Poem is a Song

 

A poem is a song

Made of color,

 

A rainbow

Made of sound,

 

A painting

Made of memory,

 

A paradise

Found.

 

 

A Poem is a Play

 

A poem is a play

meant to delight.

 

A poem is a show

meant to excite.

 

A poem is a song

full of desire.

 

A poem is a sunset

meant to inspire.

 

A poem is a secret

shared with friends.

 

A poem is a promise

that never ends.

 

 

A Poem is a Busy Bee

 

A poem is a busy bee

Buzzing in your head.

His hive is full of hidden thoughts

Waiting to be said.

 

His honey comes from your ideas

That he makes into rhyme.

He flies around looking for

What goes on in your mind.

 

When it’s time to let him out

To make some poetry,

He gathers up your secret thoughts

And then he sets them free!

 

 

A Poem is a Little Path

 

A poem is a little path

That leads you through the trees.

It takes you to the cliffs and shores,

To anywhere you please.

 

Follow it and trust your way

With mind and heart as one,

And when the journey’s over,

You’ll find you’ve just begun.

 

Charles Ghigna – Father Goose® lives in a treehouse in the middle of Alabama. He served as poet-in-residence and chair of creative writing at the Alabama School of Fine Arts, and as a nationally syndicated feature writer for Tribune Media Services. He is the author of more than 100 award-winning books for children and adults from Random House, Disney, Hyperion, Scholastic, Simon & Schuster, Time Inc., Abrams, Charlesbridge, Capstone, Orca and other publishers. His poems appear in hundreds of magazines from The New Yorker and Harper’s to Cricket and Highlights. For more information, please visit his website at FatherGoose.com

Where Do Poems Come From?

I’m asked that question a lot. Where do poems come from? Where do you get your ideas? It’s like one of those questions we hear from our children, “Where do babies come from?” A wise parent will offer an explanation based upon what they think is appropriate for the age and level of understanding of their child. If the child is still a toddler, we often offer up a warm smile and say something loving and vague about love and heaven and a twinkle in the eye. When the child is a little older, we might begin with a little introduction to the basics of reproduction. In either case, we sometimes feel as though we’ve fallen short of sharing the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth about the wonderfully intricate details of creation.

 

Answering the question of “Where do poems come from” is a lot like that. I’m often tempted to answer with a tongue-in-cheek smile, “Oh, I have a little black book with a list of all the ideas in it. When I need new ideas and inspiration all I have to do is open that magical little book, pick out an idea, and start writing.”

 

After my school assembly programs, I like to allow time for students and teachers to ask questions. Recently a student asked that question, “Where do you get your ideas?” Without thinking, I said, “Everywhere!” I went on to explain how I’m often inspired by “little things, quiet moments, by nature, children, pets, animals, family, friends, and from the real and imagined visions I see along my daily walks.” I’m not sure that was enough, but that’s all I had for her in that fleeting moment.

 

Later, during a little after school workshop with teachers, one of them mentioned how much she liked my answer. Another teacher who is also a writer asked me to elaborate. I was caught off guard for a second, then I thought perhaps the best answer would be to simply share an example of how I got an idea and how I developed it into a poem. I picked one of my most memorable moments of inspiration. It was a poem that was born right after my son was born.

 

When my son was born, my wife and I purchased one of those wonderful gadgets that allows parents to listen in on their sleeping babies. I remember waking up in the middle of the night and listening to my son’s babbling coming in over our new nursery monitor. I listened for a while, then drifted back off to sleep. In the morning over coffee, I thought about that sweet midnight serenade and how it sounded as though my son was speaking in two different voices, like characters in a dream play. The possibility of his having already discovered the joy of storytelling occurred to me. At what age does imagination begin? Are we ever able to fully comprehend our own inherent powers of creation?

 

My son’s babbles sparked those questions — and this poem.

 

For My Son Who Talks In His Sleep

For My Son Who Talks In His Sleep

 

The babble of babies rises again in your room

and I wonder what new friends

you are making tonight.

 

Not yet two, you have learned the joy of dreaming,

the endless gift, my son, of making

the make-believe come true.

 

Before you were born

a fortune teller told your mother

we would have an author for a son.

 

And I want you to know

how much I love hearing

this story you are telling tonight.

 

Exquisite lamb,

you lie awake in dreams

conversing with the other angels.

 

Your waking world

will never count you in

as just another sheep.

Creation is yours for the making.

 

Poems come from everywhere. All we have to do look — and listen. —Charles Ghigna

Charles Ghigna - Father Goose®Charles Ghigna – Father Goose® lives in a treehouse in the middle of Alabama. He served as poet-in-residence and chair of creative writing at the Alabama School of Fine Arts, and as a nationally syndicated feature writer for Tribune Media Services. He is the author of more than 100 award-winning books for children and adults from Random House, Disney, Hyperion, Scholastic, Simon & Schuster, Time Inc., Abrams, Charlesbridge, Capstone, Orca and other publishers. His poems appear in hundreds of magazines from The New Yorker and Harper’s to Cricket and Highlights. For more information, please visit his website at FatherGoose.com

The Poetry of Life

We are all poets. Each one of us sees the world in our own special way. Whenever we look up at the passing clouds and see long tail dragons and sailing ships we are poets. When we share our visions and dreams we are poets. We are poets whenever we tell the world who we are, what we think, and how we feel.

What is Poetry?

A whisper,
a shout,
thoughts turned
inside out.

A laugh,
a sigh,
an echo
passing by.

A rhythm,
a rhyme,
a moment
caught in time.

A moon,
a star,
a glimpse
of who you are.

 

Poetry is music, theater, dance, art, and literature. Poetry is winter, spring, summer, and fall. Poetry is laughter and tears, faith, and fears. Poetry is life!

 

So what do poets like to write about? I’ve written poems for children’s magazines such as Cricket, Spider, Ladybug, and Babybug on a variety of subjects from “Snowfall in the City” to “Roses After the Rain,” from sunny days of “Summertime” to “The Cold Gray Days of Winter.”

 

Poetry is everywhere! It’s in the smile of a friend and in the sound of the wind. It’s in the scent of the meadow and in the skyline of the city. It’s in the setting sun as she bows her bright orange dress away into the purple haze of evening.

 

 

Finding poetry in the world and sharing it with others makes us feel alive. It fills us with hope and wonder. It celebrates life. It shines light into the corners of the world and turns the overlooked and the common into sparkling gems of wonder and joy.

 

Poetry is everywhere! It’s in the smile of a friend and in the sound of the wind. It’s in the scent of the meadow and in the skyline of the city. It’s in the setting sun as she bows her bright orange dress away into the purple haze of evening.

 

So what else do poets like to write about? We like to write about everything! Sometimes we write poems that compare one thing to another. We call that metaphor. Sometimes our metaphors compare poetry to things!

 

A Poem is a Spider Web

A poem is a spider web
Spun with words of wonder,
Woven lace held in place
By whispers made of thunder.

* * *

A Poem is a Firefly

A poem is a firefly
Upon the summer wind.
Instead of shining where she goes,
She lights up where she’s been.

* * *

A Poem is a Painting

A poem is a painting,
A masterpiece you’ll find
Hanging on display inside
The gallery of your mind.

* * *

A Poem is a Busy Bee

A poem is a busy bee
Buzzing in your head.
His hive is full of hidden thoughts
Waiting to be said.

His honey comes from your ideas
That he makes into rhyme.
He flies around looking for
What goes on in your mind.

When it’s time to let him out
To make some poetry,
He gathers up your secret thoughts—
And then he sets them free!

 

So what is poetry? It’s life! It’s also the little path that leads us all the way to wonderland — and back.

 

A Poem is a Little Path

A poem is a little path
That leads you through the trees.
It takes you to the cliffs and shores,
To anywhere you please.

Follow it and trust your way
With mind and heart as one,
And when the journey’s over,
You’ll find you’ve just begun.

 

 

Charles Ghigna – Father Goose® lives in a treehouse in the middle of Alabama.
He is the author of more than 5,000 poems and 100 books from Random House,
Disney, Hyperion, Scholastic, Simon & Schuster, Abrams, Charlesbridge, Capstone and other publishers.
His poems appear in hundreds of magazines from The New Yorker and Harper’s to Cricket and Highlights.
For more ideas about poetry, please visit his website at FatherGoose.com

Art by Barry Gott