The 6th Annual Global Invent It Challenge

Go ahead and get your kids thinking about a real world environmental issue because the Invent It! Challenge is back and better than ever! This 6th annual challenge, a partnership between Cricket Media and the Smithsonian Institution’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation is launching on January 17, 2017 and kids from ages 5 to 21 are invited to participate.

 

To enter the Invent It! Challenge, kids can work individually or in groups to identify a real-world environmental issue and come up with a planet-friendly solution to the problem. Each invention must demonstrate all seven of the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab Key Steps of the Invention Process. Have your child review the steps below to get a sense for exactly what goes into a successful invention.

 

Step One: Think it

Invention is all about solving problems, so your first step is to identify an environmental problem you want to work on. Look around you – what environmental problems do you see in your community? Ask friends, teachers, and family members about environmental issues that are important to them. Make a list, and choose the one that you want to help solve.

 

Step Two: Explore it

Whatever problem you identify, you should know you’re probably not the first inventor to try to solve it! Do some research to learn how others have addressed the problem. What do you like about their solutions, and what do you think you can improve? Think about what your invention will do, who it will be for, and how it will be different from any of the other inventions you read about.”

 

Step Three: Sketch it

Once you have a basic plan for your invention, make some simple sketches of your idea to show how it might work. Sketching helps you get the idea out of your head and onto paper where you can really see it.

 

Step Four: Create it

For many inventors, this is the most fun part of the invention process! This is where you create a prototype, or model, of your invention. Using your sketches as a guide, build a prototype. Creating your prototype will help make your ideas visible to others.

 

Step Five: Try it

Once your prototype is finished, ask friends, teachers, parents, and neighbors to try it or review it. What suggestions do they have for making your invention better?

 

Step Six: Tweak it

Tweak it Using the feedback you got in the Try It step, identify ways you can improve your invention. Keep working on your idea!

 

Step Seven: Sell it

Once you’ve created your invention, you want people to start using it! How will you convince others to try your invention? Think about your target audience. Then create a “fact sheet” or a video or a written pitch about your invention. What health problem does it solve? Who should actually use it? How does it work? How is it different from other inventions? Answer these questions to explain how your invention will lead to a healthier environmental future!

 

Parents, you should also have your child check out the videos submitted by  previous winners to get a good idea of how other kids took on the Invent It! Challenge. And be sure to look for more blog posts here featuring tips, inspiration, and information that might make the process even more enjoyable and productive.

 

Also, be sure to check out the Invent It! Challenge homepage on January 17, 2016 to view the Scoring Guide for this contest and the Official Rules which set forth entry details, deadlines, and eligibility requirements.

 

The 6th Annual Global Invent It Challenge

 

We can’t wait to see the real environmental challenges our young inventors solve this year. We know we’ve got some of the world’s best minds on the case.

Invent It Challenge: Mission Accomplished!

Today marks the final day young inventors can submit their inventions to the 2016 Invent It Challenge. We are excited to see all the innovative ideas and concepts rolling in and the judges are ready to start evaluating each project’s merits based on how well the inventor followed the 7-step invention process outlined by Spark Labs.

 

Many times after a person hands in a project they have worked so hard on, they experience a myriad of emotions that range from happiness that they completed the project to utter sadness that it is over. This is normal. You might also find that your inventor starts to second-guess their work. They may regret adding or deleting something. They may feel like they didn’t show enough of their work. Again, this is normal. Instead of dwelling on these feelings, why not encourage them to make something new. All around them are problems of all sizes waiting to be solved and new products waiting to be created. And no matter what they make, the 7-step invention process is a perfect template to help them clearly think the project through and achieve optimal results.

 

Good luck to everyone who entered the Invent Challenge this year. Our judges will announce the winners on April 15th. If your child decided to sit this one out, we hope they will join us next year. In the meantime, remind them to keep their thinking caps on. You never know where or when a good idea will come looking for you.

It’s Time to Face the Sharks in the Invent It Challenge

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is coming to a close. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 were asked to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. This week we will focus on the final step: Sell It!

 

I’m not usually a fan of family television watching, but there is one show I always enjoy watching as a family: Shark Tank.

 

Here’s the thing: while it can be obvious that they contrive some controversial dialogue between the Sharks in order to ramp up the drama, overall I like how accountable the presenters have to be for their inventions. They can’t just waltz in and say “Here’s a great idea, now give me money.” They have to answer hard-hitting questions, show their research, demonstrate needs in the market, and more. Basically, they have to following the same exact steps as the entrants in the Invent It Challenge, and the presentation to the Sharks is the final step: Selling it.

 

Now, as evidenced in my previous post, I’m fully supportive of innovation and coming up with new inventions or solutions, but I also believe you need to put some work behind it and make it a reality. Good ideas are useless if you don’t do something with them. Watching the inventors “sell” their idea is a major reason my family likes this show. As we watch, we discuss the pros and cons of each proposal, the need in the market – and more importantly, how relevant it is to us (after all, if *WE* are not going to use it, we certainly won’t fund it with our hypothetical millions). We also discuss whether we think the presenter knows his or her stuff. Finally, we make predictions on whether the project will get funded.

 

In this last week of the Invent It Challenge, it’s time for your favorite inventor to “sell” their project to our judges. While they aren’t “Sharks,” the judges are looking to hear the details of what makes this invention special. Prior to presenting to our judges, your inventor might want to create a “fact sheet” or written pitch about his or her invention that contains all the information they want to showcase. Remind them to answer key questions such as: What health problem does the invention solve? How is it different from other inventions? Who is the “target audience”? Who should use your invention? How does it work? Finally, have them explain how their invention will lead to a healthier future!

 

Here are a few more tips for our inventors: Speak clearly and slowly. Try to create your video in a quiet place with no background noise, and remember that no one has as much knowledge of this new invention as you do. Finally, if you need some additional dos and donts, why not watch an episode or two of Shark Tank to perfect your product and your pitch. Once you’re satisfied with the presentation, hit the submit button! You’re done and it’s time for our judges to have a look at all your hard work.

 

Cricket Media Mama is not one of the Invent It judges. This is a good thing as she often enjoys impersonating her ‘favorite’ Shark – Mr. Fantastic – and no kid needs to hear “Impress me in 90 seconds or you’re dead to me.”

 

Meet Allie: Taking the Invent It Challenge by Storm

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. This week we have the chance to speak with one of our entrants.

 

Meet 10-year-old Allie from South Dakota

 

Cricket Media: How did you get the idea for your invention?

 

Allie: A few weeks before I got the idea, I went sledding with my family. It was a really warm day, but my gloves were wet. This caused my fingers to get really cold, and I got frostbite. I didn’t even realize that it was happening, and now that I have had frostbite, it means that I am considered high risk to get it again too, so how can I stop it from happening? That is when I came up for the idea of the frost stopper. A wearable frost bite warning system for people who spend time outside in cold weather.

 

Cricket Media: Who do you think your invention will benefit?

 

Allie: I made it for anyone who dislikes getting frostbite, or has already gotten it and is also considered high risk. I also made it mostly for kids like me. I was afraid to play outside because I didn’t know if I was going to get frostbite again. It’s not fun to watch everyone else play in the snow while you are sitting inside. I wanted to give myself and other people a way to not worry and to play again. Plus I am a kid and designed the system with kids in mind. You have to think and do things a bit differently than if you design for a grown up. No one I had found had ever looked at this problem from a kid’s perspective before.

 

Cricket Media: What was the most difficult part of creating your invention?

 

Allie: I think that writing and configuring the programming for Arduino for my invention was the hardest part because it is a whole new thing I had to learn how to do in order to make my invention. There are so many things that could go wrong all at the same time. There are just a lot of aspects to it that I am not used to keeping track of. I am still working on it. I started using Arduino in December when I got one for Christmas so I had only done a few small projects on it before I jumped into my invention project. It was not easy, like learning a whole new language.

 

2016 Invent It Challenge - Allie

Allie did all the soldering and wiring for her project herself.

 

Cricket Media: What was your favorite step in the invention process so far?

 

Allie: I like doing the hardware and all of the soldering, and hooking up the wires, it is probably my favorite part of all these kinds of projects.

 

Cricket Media: Did your invention work the first time you tried it or did you need to go back to the drawing board?

 

Allie: Well I needed to get new ideas often, because I would find something that would not work so I would tweak it and do it again, then maybe that would not work so I would do it again, and I would repeat this process until it finally works out. I wired things wrong once and almost burned my finger, I hooked up a sensor backwards. One problem I had to face was I found out that my dad purchased the wrong sensors for my project, so I had to figure out how to use the ones he bought instead of the one I had researched and planned for. This meant I had to change my Arduino code again! It was a long process.

 

Cricket Media: How did you find out about the Invent It Challenge?

 

Allie: At my school last year, my teacher would find different competitions that we could do. It was not required that we enter, but she had us start and brainstorm and follow the steps of the Spark Lab Invent-it Challenge and I was really excited because I already loved to invent things.

 

Cricket Media: Have you ever entered the contest before?

 

Allie: Yes, I entered last year with my friend from class, Chase.  We got an honorable mention with our invention, the “Goal-rilla Soccer Helper”. You can see our project on the winner’s page from last year’s challenge.

 

2016 Invent It Challenge

Here’s Allie with her finished invention. We can’t wait to see how she does!

Cricket Media: What would you like to be when you grow up?

 

Allie: First I will get my doctorate degree in engineering. After, I would like to either work as a NASA engineer, or work on my own inventions, then sell them for a couple million dollars. Then I will become a patent lawyer and when I retire, a librarian.

 

Cricket Media: What are your favorite activities outside of school?

 

Allie: I play soccer and tennis. I go to activities at Church. I look forward to the science competitions at school and in my community, and I participate on an awesome LEGO League Team. My favorite website is DIY.org which is an awesome kid’s online community where you can do awesome projects!

Invent It Week 6: Tweak It!

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. This week we will focus on Step 6: Tweak It!

 

This week we will give you some tips to help your child through the tweaking stage, where the inventor will attempt to iron out any bugs and really get their new product to the stage where it functions as he or she originally envisioned it.

 

Tweaking Previous Inventions

 

Improving on, or tweaking, previous inventions has paved the way for the development of virtually every technology used by people today. If your child was disappointed with the results of their testing, remind them that it is usually not enough to just come up with an original idea. Even the best ideas need to be honed and refined in order to reach their full potential. For example, the carburetor, an essential component of the automobile, went through many different versions before it was ready to run the engines of cars similar to the ones we use today. Even now, changes and improvements are being made to make cars run longer, faster, cleaner, and better. With each tweak, the car evolves into something better and is able to meet the needs of more people.

 

This bring us to the tweaks your child’s project might need. First analyze the testing. Did everything work out as planned or were there a few surprises or set-backs? Be sure to have your inventor document the major changes the project needs and show the different tweaks he/she is making to ensure the project works to the best of its ability. Does the inventor need to modify the design or change the materials it’s made from? Should he or she add a new part to your invention, or take something away to make it simpler?

 

Keep in mind that this testing/tweaking stage does not have to be a one-time event. Have the inventor try the invention again after their first tweak and see what happens. Many inventors try and tweak and then try again to keep improving their idea until they get it just the way the want it! One of our winners from last year shared with us that she needed to build 4 different prototypes before she got her invention to the point where it was able to work properly.

 

With just 3 weeks until the submission deadline, this is also the time to get all the inventor’s information assembled so he or she is ready to create the presentation that will position them as a strong contender in the 5th Annual Global Invent It Challenge.

 

Missed learning about the previous Invent It! 2016 steps?

Invent It Week 5: Try It!

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is finally off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. For the next 7 weeks or so, we are going to be highlighting each step in the Spark!Lab’s seven-step process with the goal of helping parents help their children make the most of this learning opportunity and achieve optimum results. This week we will focus on Step 5: Try It!

 

Did you ever see the movie “The Dolphin Tale”? It’s a lovely story about how the Clearwater Marine Aquarium saves a young dolphin whose tail was damaged beyond repair. Luckily, a prosthetics doctor is able to create a new tail for the dolphin that they hope will allow her to swim naturally. A key scene takes place when the doctor brings the new tail to the aquarium and they strap it on for the first test. There is big drama as we all wonder if it will help the dolphin swim. I hope I’m not ruining the story if I tell you that this first prototype does not actually work. Everyone was hopeful it would, but until they were actually able to try it, there was no way to know for sure.

 

Now, I want you to remember back to Week One of the Invent It Challenge where your child thought about ideas for his/her invention. Possibly they even talked to someone they thought their invention might help or to one of the health care workers who would be charged with using the invention on a daily basis. Well, this week it is time for your child to go back to those helpful folks and have them try out the prototype they created last week in a real-world environment. Will the invention work or, like the prototype dolphin’s tail, will it need some serious tweaking?

 

Here are a few considerations your child should keep in mind for this first prototype test:

 

Are there design flaws?: Does your prototype actually work? Does it work the way you thought it would?

 

Is it easy to use?: Did the person testing out your prototype enjoy using it? Could they figure out how to make it work?  Do you need to include instructions to help your user make the most of the invention?

 

Is it safe?: This probably goes without saying but any device created has to safe for both the user and anyone standing nearby. If there are sparks, unforeseen heat, or sharp edges, take the project back to the drawing board.

 

Did you forget anything?: Are there any extra features you need to add to your prototype that would really help it achieve its goal. For example, would lengthening the electrical cord allow the user to be more comfortable? Would changing the size of the final product make the weight more portable?

 

Did you solve the problem?: Assuming your prototype actually works, does it actually solve the problem you were trying to solve? Did it create other problems in the meantime? It’s no good, for example, to create a wheelchair that can climb stairs if that same wheelchair restricts the user’s mobility in other ways.

 

Make sure your inventor takes good notes while his or her test subject is trying out the invention so they know what needs to be fixed or adjusted. And if they get discouraged by setbacks, turn on “The Dolphin’s Tale” for some heartwarming inspiration.

 

Dolphin Tale

 

Missed learning about the previous Invent It! 2016 steps?

Invent It Challenge Week 4: Create It!

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is finally off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. For the next 7 weeks or so, we are going to be highlighting each step in the Spark!Lab’s seven-step process with the goal of helping parents help their children make the most of this learning opportunity and achieve optimum results.

 

Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy. It’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for. It’s time for your child to take the idea they have developed, researched, and sketched and create a prototype of their life-changing invention.

 

While this may be one of the most exciting parts of the invention process, it is also likely to be filled with setbacks, frustrations, and changes to the plan. In engineering, things often don’t work the way you think they will. To help your child navigate through this step, here are some things your young inventor should keep in mind throughout the Create It process:

 

1- Start with materials you already have around the house.

 

When you are about to start creating something new it can be tempting to run out to the hardware or craft store and buy a slew of new supplies and materials. In general,however, it is better to help your child find materials you already have around the house for this first attempt at creating their project. Ask them to think of materials that are approximately the same size or shape as what they may eventually use. For example, if your child’s project needs PVC pipe, approximate it with the tubing from wrapping paper or paper towels. If your child needs some sort of fabric, see if anyone has an old towel or sheet that can be cut up. Using recyclable materials will save you money and give your child a chance to think about the best materials to use for their finished product.

 

2- Keep the design simple

 

Remind your child not to get too fancy with this first try at engineering their invention. He or she doesn’t need decorations or frills. This attempt should be the bare bones type of engineering where just getting the pieces to fit together into an approximation of the final is the goal.

 

3- Don’t try to get it perfect the first time

 

See tip #2. It doesn’t need to be even close to perfect this first time. In fact, remind your child that failure is part of the invention process. So is trying again. If your child is getting upset that things aren’t going as planned have them take a break and come back to it later.

 

4- Document your progress as you go.

 

The Invent It judges want to see each step of the invention process so have someone take pictures of your child’s attempts to get their project through this phase. If your child is struggling, having pictures of what is going wrong can also be a good way to review what is and what isn’t working. Reviewing the pictures might also give the inventor a new way of seeing the project or a new idea to fix a piece that isn’t going as planned.

 

5- Think outside the lines.

 

Yes, your child drew a diagram in a certain way, but if the actual building isn’t quite living up to the drawing, it’s time for your child to reimagine how the project might work. Have the inventor make a new drawing accounting for the challenges they’ve discovered and add that drawing to your documentation. This is part of the documentation process that the judges love to see.

 

After your child gets their first prototype to completion, take some time to celebrate their initiative and their creativity. He or she is a maker in the truest sense of the word and we can’t wait to see the amazing inventions they are creating.

 

Missed learning about the previous Invent It! 2016 steps?

Invent It Challenge Week 3: Sketch It!

The 2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challenge is finally off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab. For the next 7 weeks or so, we are going to be highlighting each step in the Spark!Lab’s seven-step process with the goal of helping parents help their children make the most of this learning opportunity and achieve optimum results.

 

Idea: Yes!

 

Research: Done!

 

Now it’s time for your child to get his or her ideas out of their heads and into some form that can be viewed by other people. This sketch stage will be fun for a lot of kids. It’s the chance to put their ideas down on paper and to see an outline of how their project might come together.

 

The Sketching Stage

 

Sketches don’t have to mean paper and pencil, although there is certainly nothing wrong with the age old method that worked for the likes of Galileo and Einstein. If drawing doesn’t appeal, there are plenty of apps and computer programs made to help inventors make schematic drawings. Two popular ones that are relatively easy for kids are Scheme-It and Smart Draw. Both of these allow the user to input the major parts of their idea in the form of general shapes, label the components, and show how the pieces might fit together.

 

Invent It Challenge: Sketch It

Past winners have sketched by hand or with computer assistance. Either way is great! Just make sure you label and give different perspectives of your invention!

 

An Invent It judge from previous years offers this advice to participants: “You may want to make several sketches of your invention – from the front, side, looking down from above, or from the inside to show how it works. Be sure to label your sketches to explain how the various parts and pieces function.” If they have questions while they are working, your child can even ask questions  of past participants. These ambassadors, who hail from all over the world, are always happy to provide advice for participants in each stage of development.

 

If your child still needs some inspiration during the sketch stage, have him check out My Crazy Inventions Sketchbook: 50 Awesome Drawing Activities for Young Inventors. This inspiring book is jam-packed with amazing drawings showing all sorts of real inventions that seem too weird to work combined with plenty of inspiration to get kids’ minds going, and extra room for kids to add their own invention ideas.

 

Finally, remind your young inventor that the sketch doesn’t have to be perfect. Stick figures are OK! The point of the sketch is to let other people see what is in the inventor’s mind. Don’t stress the details. It’s the big picture that really counts.

 

Missed learning about the first two Invent It! 2016 steps?

 

Invent It Challenge Week 2: Explore It!

The2016 Spark!Lab Invent It Challengeis finally off and running. This year, kids ages 5 to 21 need to identify a real-world health problem and come up with a solution to the problem. Each entry must follow the seven step invention process spelled out by our partner, theSmithsonian’s Spark!Lab. For the next 7 weeks or so, we are going to be highlighting each step in the Spark!Lab’s seven-step process with the goal of helping parents help their children make the most of this learning opportunity and achieve optimum results.

 

Your child has finally narrowed down his or her options.  A great idea, one with the potential to effect change in the field of medicine, is starting to grow. And now your child wants to know: what’s next?

 

The next step in the Invent It Challenge is to do some research. An old saying proclaims, “there is nothing new under the sun,” and that goes for new inventions. Chances are someone else has identified the same problem and came up with a solution of their own. This “Explore It” phase of development is meant to help your young inventor capitalize on the work that has already been done.

 

2016 Invent It Challenge

 

Explore It

 

Finding out that someone else has tackled the same problem shouldn’t be discouraging for your child. It’s actually a great opportunity. It’s a chance to see other solutions, to evaluate things that can be changed, to improve on what came before. Your child might also find links to schematics and drawings, get advice or suggestions from experts in the field, or even discover some facet of the problem that they hadn’t considered before.

 

Your child should keep a record of their research. They will need to show this work as part of their entry for the Invent It Challenge. (No shortcuts here. Each entry must demonstrate all seven of Spark!Lab’s Key Steps of the Invention Process.) Your child’s research should identify specific features and benefits of their invention over what has been done previously and should show how their specific approach makes improvements to what is already available.

 

Start Your Research

 

If your child is working as part of a group, the group can choose to assign this step to one member who may be enthusiastic about this step. That team member can then present his or her findings to the group so they can all be aware of what else has been done. Or each team member can work on their own research, bringing their results back to the group so they can compare and contrast the information they discovered. Either way, it is important for each member of the group to be well versed in what has already been done, so they can work to improve upon, not duplicate, someone else’s work.

 

With a good idea in hand, it can be tempting to a young inventor to skip the research step and just get to work. For many people, the doing is the fun part. Research can seem like a waste of time. If you are getting push-back on this step in your house or from your team, keep in mind that doing research is a key part of the learning process. It will help you succeed in both the short and the long run as you work on this project and many others to come.

 

Want to learn about the first step? Invent It Challenge Week 1: Think It!

Get Ready to Invent Something for the Invent It! Challenge

Go ahead and get your kids thinking about a real world health problem because the Invent It! Challenge is back and better than ever! This 5th annual challenge, a partnership between Cricket Media and the Smithsonian Institution is launching on January 15, 2016 and kids from ages 5 to 21 are invited to participate.

 

To enter the Invent It! Challenge, kids can work individually or in groups to identify a real-world health problem and create their very own solution to the problem. Each invention must demonstrate all seven of the Smithsonian’s Spark!Lab Key Steps of the Invention Process:

 

Step One: Think it

Invention is all about solving problems, so your first step is to identify a health problem or challenge you want to work on. Look around you – what health challenges do you see at school or in your community? Ask friends, teachers, family members, or even your doctor or a nurse, about health issues that are important to them. Make a list, and choose the one that you want to help solve.

 

Step Two: Explore it

If you’ve identified a health problem that affects many people around you (or even around the world), you’re probably not the first inventor to try to solve it! Do some research to learn how others have addressed the problem. What do you like about their solutions, and what do you think you can improve? Think about what your invention will do, who it will be for, and how it will be different from any of the other inventions you read about.”

 

Step Three: Sketch it

Once you have a basic plan for your invention, make some simple sketches of your idea to show how it might work. Sketching helps you get the idea out of your head and onto paper where you can really see it.

 

Step Four: Create it

For many inventors, this is the most fun part of the invention process! This is where you create a prototype, or model, of your invention. Using your sketches as a guide, build a prototype. Creating your prototype will help make your ideas visible to others.

 

Step Five: Try it

Once your prototype is finished, ask friends, teachers, parents, and neighbors to try it or review it. It’s even better if you test it with someone who is affected by or interested in the health challenge you’re trying to solve. What suggestions do they have for making your invention better?

 

Step Six: Tweak it

Tweak it Using the feedback you got in the Try It step, identify ways you can improve your invention. Keep working on your idea!

 

Step Seven: Sell it

Once you’ve created your invention, you want people to start using it! How will you convince others to try your invention? Think about your target audience. Then create a “fact sheet” or a video or a written pitch about your invention. What health problem does it solve? Who should actually use it? How does it work? How is it different from other inventions? Answer these questions to explain how your invention will lead to a healthier future!

 

You should also have your child check out the videos submitted by previous winners to get a good idea of how other kids took on the Invent It! Challenge. And be sure to look for more blog posts here featuring tips, inspiration, and information that might make the process even more enjoyable and productive.

 

Also, be sure to check out the Invent It! Challenge homepage on January 15, 2016 to view the Scoring Guide for this contest and the Official Rules which set forth entry details, deadlines and eligibility requirements.

 

We can’t wait to see the real world heath challenges our young inventors solve this year. We know we’ve got some of the world’s best minds on the case.